What I Do & How Much It Costs

Cultural Heritage Landscapes (CHL)

CHLs are typically by-products of a Heritage Evaluation Study. A cultural heritage landscape is typically a larger evolved site, often with many related buildings, where analysis will show that the artefacts are more intelligible (and better managed) as an evolving, interactive contextual system. Simple, right?

The examples I know best are estates and farms. Estates are systems of related components that include landscape and built forms from front gates, viewscaped circulation routes, lodges, pavilions, main houses, recreational spaces, gardens, ponds, and yards. While any single part could be analyzed and designated as a heritage resource, it really doesn’t make sense to consider the rose garden without understanding the walkway that leads from the gallery to the rose garden and then back to the entrance gates.

Similarly with a farm. Typically plantings on farms tend to be lineal and intended to demarcate zones of use: the front yard from the driveway, the pasture from the back forty. The house, the barn, the ice house, the drive shed, the paddocks, the fields and the yards are, again, parts of an interrelated whole. There is a gestaltish quality to these things: they are greater in toto than the sum of their parts.

Through professional specialization and experience with these, I’ve evolved a few sets of criteria for determining whether a site best fits the definition of a CHL.

(Please click on any image below for project-specific details.)